Blog Archive:

Posted on Thu, 2019-11-14 11:21 by Matthew J. Focht in Five Questions, Attorneys, Personal Injury

1. What made you become a lawyer?

Posted on Mon, 2019-10-28 10:07 by Reza Golesorkhi in Five Questions, Family Law

1.       What made you become a lawyer?


My college professor was a personal injury lawyer and taught a course called Legal Aspects of Medicine.  He soon became a mentor.  I then was applying to Medical School but my wife got pregnant which changed my career path as Medicine would take 12 + years and Law took only 3 years. Hence, I chose law. 


2.       What will be the biggest challenge for the generation behind you?

Posted on Tue, 2019-10-22 23:00 by Lindsay Parvis in Family Law, Divorce, Maryland

This blog, the second in a three-part series, (click here for Part 1) looks at other states’ grounds for divorce and how they compare to Maryland, when considering the broader question (discussed in Part 3) about whether it’s time to overhaul Maryland’s grounds for divorce.  Part

Posted on Tue, 2019-10-15 14:11 by Allison McFadden in Divorce, Family Law, Custody

Sharing our thoughts, photos and personal details on social media is so ingrained in many peoples’ lives that we do not think twice about the wealth of information left behind for anyone and everyone to discover.  But it should be a thought and consideration if you find in yourself heading towards a divorce or custody litigation.  As part of the discovery process you will likely have to produce complete copies of the history of your social media accounts.  It does not matter if your accounts are set to private - there is still a duty to provide the relevant discovery.

Posted on Mon, 2019-10-14 11:46 by Darin L. Rumer in Five Questions, Family Law

 1.       What made you become a lawyer?


In college (in the South), I studied psychology and sociology.  I wanted to become a family counselor.  I took a job on weekends and in the summer working at a group home for underprivileged children.  After witnessing a friend and colleague being racially discriminated against, firsthand, it motivated me to use my influence in law for social good.  The next semester I started to study for the LSAT and to look at law schools.  I’ve been practicing law for almost 20 years and I still look to protect the disenfranchised.

Posted on Mon, 2019-10-07 09:23 by Brian J. Markovitz in Overtime, Labor and Employment

Overtime pay for workweeks involving more than 40 hours of work is just one of the protections the law provides to prevent the exploitation of working people.  The Department of Labor revises its policies periodically to reflect the changes in the economy, and the overtime pay regulations are no exception to this principle.  On September 24, 2019, the U.S.

Posted on Tue, 2019-10-01 08:59 by Jay P. Holland in Labor & Employement

Maryland Expands Anti-Discrimination Law To Include Independent Contractors, And Expand Rights of Harassment Victims


The Maryland Human Relations Act (the “Maryland HRA”), is generally broader and procedurally distinct from its federal counterpart, commonly referred to as Title VII. Maryland has now amended its law in some very significant respects.


Independent Contractors

Posted on Thu, 2019-09-26 09:53 by Brian J. Markovitz in Labor & Employment

Federal, state, and local law protect workers from discrimination by employers based on a variety of factors, such as race and gender, as well as personal circumstances such as disabilities, pregnancy, and the unexpected need to provide care for family members.  Discrimination can take the form of withholding of job offers to applicants, unjustified termination of current employees, or harassment in the workplace.  When employers consistently pay workers with the same level of education and experience different salaries for performing the same job duties, discrimination may be the reason wh

Posted on Mon, 2019-09-09 13:01 by Allison McFadden in Family Law, Five Questions

1.       What made you become a lawyer?


I started out in college as an education major, thinking that I wanted to teach and eventually become a professor.  I did not enjoy my education classes at all, and by chance I took a legal writing class as an elective.  It focused on persuasive writing, and I found that I really enjoyed it.  That planted a seed, and got me to start looking into law school.  I ended up working for a year after college before going to law school, and that solidified the decision for me.


2.       What is it like being a woman in a male dominated field?

Posted on Wed, 2019-08-28 13:12 by Allison McFadden in Divorce, Family Law

It can seem like everything changes after a divorce or separation, and back to school is no exception.  If you are newly separated, this might be the first year you are not there to drop your kids off on the first day of school.  Or if you have recently moved as a result of the divorce, your kids might be nervous about starting at a new school.

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