Blog Archive: December 2014

Posted on Fri, 2014-12-19 14:55 by Joseph M. Creed in Labor Employment

 


Last week, the Supreme Court ruled that federal law does not require that warehouse workers who package goods for Amazon be paid for the time they spend going through mandatory security screenings at the end of their shifts. These warehouse workers are required to go through a screening process—which is intended to prevent theft and can sometimes take as long as 25 minutes—before they are permitted to leave for the day. The Court ruled that the workers are not legally entitled to be paid for that time. Predictably, there has been strong reaction to the ruling, with some calling it a slap in the face to America’s blue-collar workers and others calling on Congress to change the law.


Despite the strong reaction, the Supreme Court’s decision in the Amazon warehouse workers case might have little impact in Maryland and other states with similar labor laws. Although the decision is the final word on the issue under federal law, it does not dictate state law. In Maryland, state law would likely require an employer to pay employees for time spent in mandatory security screenings and other mandatory, onsite tasks. This post will give an overview of the Supreme Court’s decision and look at how Maryland state law differs.


Security Line Do Not Cross - Barricade Tape - 3 in. X 1000 ft. lengths - 3 Mil Durable Polyethylene


Posted on Thu, 2014-12-11 23:00 by in Civil Rights

 


 


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Recent reports are that law students are demanding to postpone their exams as a result of the national tragedies in Ferguson and New York.


Students who find it impossible to take tests because of news reports about injustices in our legal system should not become constitutional lawyers. Better yet, they should find another career altogether.


Posted on Fri, 2014-12-05 16:56 by Anne Grover in Family Law

 


In Maryland, the Court has the authority to appoint what is called a Best Interest Attorney.  What is that, you ask?  Well, it is the term used in our courts to categorize any of the various lawyers for children; this is also the modern multi-purpose term used for a Guardian Ad Litem, Nagle v. Hooks Attorney, and regular old attorney.


Posted on Fri, 2014-12-05 14:50 by Joseph M. Creed in Labor Employment

 


Understanding the new “ban the box” laws in Montgomery County and Prince George’s County


Criminal Record


            Most people would assume that the question, “do you have a criminal record?,” would come up early in a job application process. And if the answer is, “yes,” it would likely be a very short process. But within the last month, Montgomery County and Prince George’s County have enacted laws restricting employers’ use of criminal histories in hiring.[1] This post explores these new labor laws and how they will impact employers and employees in these counties.


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