Discrimination

Posted on Fri, 2014-07-18 00:00 by Roberta Roberts in Discrimination, Labor Employment, Maryland Law

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Eight years ago, Maryland’s Reasonable Accommodations for Pregnant Workers Act (“RAPWA”) [1], which went into effect on October 1, 2013, did not exist, and the United Parcel Service (“UPS”) denied a pregnant Maryland employee’s request to lift no more than 20 pounds at work on the written advisement of her doctor.


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 (One of the trademarks registered to Pro Football, Inc. d/b/a/ The Washington Redskins)


On Wednesday, the United States Patent And Trademark Office (Trademark Trial and Appeal Board or “TTAB”) canceled the Washington Redskins’ trademark registrations in the start of what is likely to be a lengthy legal battle.


 


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Can an employer be liable for racist and sexist comments by a client or business partner—someone who does not even work for the employer—toward one of its employees?


Under a recent decision by the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, the answer is “yes.” In Freeman v. Dal-Tile Corp., a decision issued on April 29, 2014, the Fourth Circuit recognized that an employer can be liable for harassment perpetrated by a third-party against one of its employees.


Posted on Fri, 2014-04-11 18:31 by Joseph M. Creed in Civil Rights, Discrimination, Federal Law, Labor Employment


On April 8, 2014, President Barack Obama signed an Executive Order prohibiting federal government contractors from retaliating against employees for disclosing their own or other employees’ salary information. This post will explore the implications of this new Executive Order for federal contractors and their employees.


Posted on Thu, 2014-01-09 21:46 by JGL Associate Attorney in Civil Litigation, Civil Rights, Discrimination, Labor Employment


While in law school, I was often asked what area of law I was interested in practicing. Inevitably someone would ask me if I was interested in becoming a family law attorney.  My almost instantaneous response was, “Oh no! Too much drama!”  Instead, I chose to practice employment law – an area that I naively believed would have fewer emotions involved than Family law.


Posted on Fri, 2013-10-18 19:11 by Brian J. Markovitz in Discrimination, Labor Employment

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What was thought by many practitioners and many in the news media to be one of the most significantly restrictive Supreme Court decisions on class actions in recent memory, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes,[1] may not be so formidable for plaintiffs seeking redress through the class action process.


Posted on Fri, 2013-10-04 17:01 by JGL Associate Attorney in Discrimination, Labor Employment

 



On October 1, 2013, the Reasonable Accommodations for Pregnant Workers Act (“RAPWA”) became effective and applies to Maryland employers who have fifteen (15) or more employees.  Taking the lead from laws like that Americans with Disabilities Act, the new RAPWA will require employers to provide reasonable accommodations for employees with a disability caused by, or contributed to, by a pregnancy.


Posted on Tue, 2013-09-24 17:32 by Jeremy Schneider in Discrimination, False Claims Act, Labor Employment


Kathy:  Jeremy, I know a large part of your practice involves whistleblower law.  Do you have any thoughts or advice to pass along on this topic to our readers?


Posted on Fri, 2013-09-20 19:49 by Jay P. Holland in Discrimination, False Claims Act, Labor Employment

 


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This past term, the Supreme Court in University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center v. Nassar held that retaliation claims under Title VII are required to be decided by what is known as the “But For” causation standard.[1]  So, if an employee reports illegal discrimination or harassment based on race, sex, or other Title VII protected conduct and suffers retaliation, the Supreme Court held that the employee must show that “but for” engaging in protected activity (reporting the illegal conduct), the employee would not have suffered the adverse action (such as termination).[2]


Posted on Fri, 2013-09-13 20:08 by Jeremy Schneider in Discrimination, False Claims Act, Labor Employment


Kathy:  Every year brings new legislation that impacts American employers and employees.  Are there any game-changing laws that have been passed or that are on the horizon for 2013?


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