Joseph Greenwald & Laake, PA Blog - all

Posted on Mon, 2019-09-09 13:01 by Allison McFadden in Family Law, Five Questions

1.       What made you become a lawyer?


I started out in college as an education major, thinking that I wanted to teach and eventually become a professor.  I did not enjoy my education classes at all, and by chance I took a legal writing class as an elective.  It focused on persuasive writing, and I found that I really enjoyed it.  That planted a seed, and got me to start looking into law school.  I ended up working for a year after college before going to law school, and that solidified the decision for me.


2.       What is it like being a woman in a male dominated field?

Posted on Wed, 2019-08-28 13:12 by Allison McFadden in Divorce, Family Law

It can seem like everything changes after a divorce or separation, and back to school is no exception.  If you are newly separated, this might be the first year you are not there to drop your kids off on the first day of school.  Or if you have recently moved as a result of the divorce, your kids might be nervous about starting at a new school.

Posted on Mon, 2019-08-12 09:20 by Jeffrey N. Greenblatt in Family Law

1.                   What made you become a lawyer?


I was a speech and drama major at Syracuse University.  I wanted to be a sports announcer.  When I graduated, I couldn’t even get someone to return my calls let alone a job offer.  I decided I’d go to law school and become a sports attorney if I couldn’t announce.  Well, that didn’t work out either. I couldn’t find a job in the area. I would have had to move to California and I was not up for it at the time.


2.            What will be the biggest challenge for the generation behind you? 

Posted on Mon, 2019-08-05 09:19 by Lindsay Parvis in Family Law, Divorce, Five Questions

1.       What made you become a lawyer?


My desire to help clients in crisis, and to navigate their way to a better situation while protecting their rights.


2.       What is it like being a woman in a male dominated field?

Posted on Wed, 2019-07-31 10:32 by Rama Taib-Lopez in

1. What made you become a lawyer?


I wanted to blend my economics background with international law by building a career in the field of international development and maybe get involved with an agency like USAID.  While I sure am far from that path, I still find my work rewarding and I enjoy applying the qualitative thinking to issues like alimony, child support, taxes, and business valuations. 


2. What is it like being a woman in a male dominated field?

Posted on Tue, 2019-07-16 14:23 by David Bulitt in Family Law

1.       What made you become a lawyer?    


I had watched the TV Show, 'Owen Marshall, Councelor at Law' and had really loved it. Also, both my father and grandfather pushed me to be a professional of some kind. The medical profession was out as I don't even like to give blood (even today!). That left me with two options: accounting and the law. Although I am decent with the numbers, I coulnd't see myself running them all day. Hence, the law. 


2.       What will be the biggest challenge for the generation behind you?

Posted on Mon, 2019-07-15 13:03 by Patrick Dragga in

1.       What made you become a lawyer? 


It was a natural path for me, as I am a son of a lawyer. Also, I have always enjoyed solving puzzles and helping others when possible, both of which are useful in my profession.  


2.       What will be the biggest challenge for the next generation?


Work-Life balance. They might be better at it than we were.


3.       What is the most interesting case you’ve ever had?

Posted on Mon, 2019-07-08 12:25 by Burt M. Kahn in Alternate Dispute Resolution

Mediation has become a popular tool for resolving medical malpractice claims.


Trials of medical negligence suits are inefficient. They require tremendous resources and the adversarial aspect of a trial actually impedes the exchange of significant information between the parties. It can easily be twice or three times longer to resolve a medical malpractice claim through a trial versus a mediated settlement.

Posted on Mon, 2019-07-01 12:17 by Tanvi Rastogi in Community
Summer in here and this is what JGL Law community recommends you read: 
 
1.       Marion Holland
Legal Assistant
Book: There Must Be An Ocean Between Us
Author: Thea Lindauer
Posted on Thu, 2019-06-27 13:35 by Veronica Nannis in Qui Tam, False Claims Act, whistleblower

Some famous whistleblowers have made headlines in recent years, but there is not a lot known about what the typical whistleblower does. Edward Snowden or Linda Tripp are famous, or infamous, examples of well-known whistleblowers. But, the typical whistleblower is not in it for the money and does not get any fame. Instead, they are the kind of person who refuses to be a bystander, or worse, a participant, in fraud.

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