Joseph Greenwald & Laake, PA Blog - Civil Litigation

Posted on Thu, 2014-09-18 13:54 by Levi S. Zaslow in Sports, Labor Law, Civil Litigation, Labor Employment


(Photo Credit: UPI/ AP; New York Post)


One of the most explosive issues in sports right now is the NFL’s discipline of its players.  Discipline has been inconsistent, the NFL is accused of seriously mishandling cases, and there is public outcry about some players’ conduct.  The two-game suspension, and subsequent indefinite suspension, of former Ravens’ running back Ray Rice is reflective of many of the broken parts of this process. 


Posted on Fri, 2014-08-15 00:00 by in Civil Litigation, Sports

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(Pro Football, Inc. d/b/a/ The Washington Redskins)


DC’s professional football team, the Washington Redskins, has been in the news quite a bit as of late – and most of it has not been good. Earlier this summer, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued a 2-1 ruling in Blackhorse v. Pro-Football, Inc. cancelling the team’s trademarks.


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 (One of the trademarks registered to Pro Football, Inc. d/b/a/ The Washington Redskins)


On Wednesday, the United States Patent And Trademark Office (Trademark Trial and Appeal Board or “TTAB”) canceled the Washington Redskins’ trademark registrations in the start of what is likely to be a lengthy legal battle.


Posted on Fri, 2014-06-06 17:55 by Jarrod S. Sharp in Civil Litigation

  terps2 This past  January, I wrote about the University of Maryland v.

 


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Can an employer be liable for racist and sexist comments by a client or business partner—someone who does not even work for the employer—toward one of its employees?


Under a recent decision by the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, the answer is “yes.” In Freeman v. Dal-Tile Corp., a decision issued on April 29, 2014, the Fourth Circuit recognized that an employer can be liable for harassment perpetrated by a third-party against one of its employees.


Posted on Mon, 2014-05-05 13:41 by Levi S. Zaslow in Civil Litigation, Maryland Law, Personal Injury


In a unanimous decision, the Court of Appeals of Maryland recently held in Blackburn Ltd. Partnership v. Paul,[1] that all Maryland public pools have a duty to comply with Maryland’s swimming pool barrier safety regulations.[2] The Court recognized that the pool barrier safety regulations were designed for the protection of young children from accidental drowning and near-drowning by limiting or delaying their access to swimming pools, spas and hot tubs.


protective_order


This past session, the Maryland legislature enacted a number of changes that affect both victims and perpetrators of domestic violence. Although certainly not a comprehensive overhaul, the new legislation touches on several important areas that affect the public’s ability to obtain and extend both peace and protective orders, as well as enhanced penalties for those who violate such orders.


Posted on Fri, 2014-02-21 16:58 by JGL Associate Attorney in Civil Litigation, Federal Law, Labor Employment




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It’s your first day on a new job. You are shown to a desk or conference table and the office manager places a large stack of papers in front of you. Tax forms, personal information forms, and the Employee Handbook. The Handbook can be small or large, and most of the time no one reads it. Nearly all of the time, however, a new employee will sign a piece of paper saying that he or she has read the handbook and understands all that is contained in the handbook. After this point, few employees ever think about what is actually written in the handbook until something bad happens. And sometimes not until it’s too late.


Posted on Fri, 2014-01-31 20:43 by Jarrod S. Sharp in Civil Litigation, Civil Procedure, Constitutional Law


On November 19, 2013, the North Carolina Court of Appeals rejected the University of Maryland’s (“UM”) attempt to dismiss a lawsuit over the university’s planned migration from the Atlantic Coast Conference (“ACC”) to the Big Ten Conference later this year.[1]  In 2012, the ACC brought suit against UM in North Carolina state court seeking a declaratory judgment that a withdrawal payment provision in the ACC Constitution was a valid liquidated damages clause enforceable against the university.


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