Joseph Greenwald & Laake, PA Blog - Civil Litigation

Posted on Fri, 2014-01-24 17:10 by Tamara A. O'Connell in Civil Litigation, Evidence, Maryland Law


Social media, like Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, allow people to connect with friends and family, sharing information, photos, and other life updates. For some, the updates are occasional; for others, social media is a platform to provide others with a minute-by-minute chronicle of their daily lives.


Posted on Thu, 2014-01-09 21:46 by JGL Associate Attorney in Civil Litigation, Civil Rights, Discrimination, Labor Employment


While in law school, I was often asked what area of law I was interested in practicing. Inevitably someone would ask me if I was interested in becoming a family law attorney.  My almost instantaneous response was, “Oh no! Too much drama!”  Instead, I chose to practice employment law – an area that I naively believed would have fewer emotions involved than Family law.



You go to the mailbox one day and find a certified letter. Upon opening the letter, you discover that you’ve just been sued! Not only that, but the case is in a Federal Court in a state that you don’t live in and that you don’t have any connection to, or so you think.


Posted on Fri, 2013-11-22 19:03 by Jeremy Schneider in Civil Litigation, False Claims Act, Labor Employment


On October 15, 2013, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit issued a False Claims Act ("FCA") judgment allowing the case to continue against Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals ("Bayer"), based on the relator’s allegations that the company fraudulently induced the Department of Defense ("DoD") to enter contracts under which a drug known as Baycol was purchased for the use of armed service men and women.


Posted on Fri, 2013-11-22 19:02 by Joseph M. Creed in Civil Litigation, Labor Employment, Maryland Law


Can an employment contract establish a right to employment for life? The Maryland Court of Appeals will take up this question in the case of Spacesaver Systems, Inc. v. Adam.


Under Maryland law, the majority of employees are “at will” employees, meaning they can be terminated at any time and for any reason—other than discrimination on the basis of race, national origin, sex, religion, another legally-protected class, or for a reason that violates Maryland public policy (a very narrow exception)—or no reason at all.


Posted on Fri, 2013-11-15 13:41 by JGL Associate Attorney in Civil Litigation, Labor Employment, Maryland Law


As a general rule, the states (including Maryland) and the federal government recognize two general categories of working relationships: employer- employee relationships, and independent contractor relationships.  While the majority of persons are employees (and the law presumes as much), employers often miscategorize workers as independent contractors.