Joseph Greenwald & Laake, PA Blog - Criminal Defense

Posted on Tue, 2015-11-24 11:56 by in

 


Maryland Court of Appeals Rules on Admissible Identification


As previously discussed in this blog, in the spring of 2014, the Maryland Court of Special Appeals in State v. Hailes,[1] made important rulings regarding several evidentiary issues. The Hailes court held that a “hard blink” can be a statement, that a “Dying Declaration” does not require actual imminent death, only a belief of imminent death, and that the Confrontation Clause of the Sixth Amendment does not suppress a dying declaration.[2] After further appeal, the Court of Appeals of Maryland recently affirmed that decision.


Posted on Fri, 2015-02-20 14:12 by Levi S. Zaslow in


“Man has long been diversely fascinated with animals.” [1]  Mike Tyson counted pet tigers among his pets, Kristen Stewart and her mother raise wolf-dog hybrids, and Tippi Hedren kept a 400-pound mature lion in her home – allowing it to play by the pool, lounge in the living room, raid the fridge, and even permitted her daughter (Melanie Griffith) to take it to bed. They are hardly alone.[2] Just two weeks ago reports surfaced that former Baltimore Ravens defensive lineman Terrence Cody kept an alligator in his Baltimore County home. In fact, owning exotic pets is nothing new. Almost two centuries ago John Quincy Adams, the sixth President of the United States, lodged an alligator in a bathtub in the White House’s East Room.


Posted on Fri, 2014-07-18 00:00 by Helen Chen in Criminal Defense, Evidence

The Duke of She told Confucius: “Among the upright men of my home, if the father steal a sheep his son will bear witness.”


Confucius answered: “Our people’s uprightness is unlike that. The father screens his son, the son screens his father. There is uprightness in this.”[i]


Posted on Fri, 2014-06-27 17:29 by Kara Fischer in Civil Rights, Constitutional Law, Criminal Defense

 


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On Wednesday June 25, in a unanimous ruling the Supreme Court held that the police need warrants to search the cellphones of people they arrest. Courts have long allowed warrantless searches in connection with arrests, allowing officers to conduct a full search of the person being arrested as well as any property on or relatively near them at the time they are arrested.


Posted on Fri, 2014-05-30 15:02 by JGL Associate Attorney in Constitutional Law, Evidence, Maryland Law


On May 27, 2014, in State v. Hailes,the Maryland Court of Special Appeals made important rulings regarding several evidentiary issues. The Hailes court held that a “hard blink” can be a statement, that a “Dying Declaration” does not require actual imminent death, only a belief of imminent death, and that the Confrontation Clause of the Sixth Amendment does not suppress a dying declaration.[1]


protective_order


This past session, the Maryland legislature enacted a number of changes that affect both victims and perpetrators of domestic violence. Although certainly not a comprehensive overhaul, the new legislation touches on several important areas that affect the public’s ability to obtain and extend both peace and protective orders, as well as enhanced penalties for those who violate such orders.


Posted on Thu, 2014-04-17 22:27 by Hina Z. Hussain in Criminal Defense, Legislative Updates, Maryland Law

tokeofthetown2013 maryland flag


  On April 14, 2014, Governor Martin O’Malley signed two bills that usher in a change for marijuana laws in Maryland. The first, Senate Bill 364, goes into effect on October 1st and decriminalizes the possession of marijuana. Under SB 364, a person cannot be criminally charged for possession of less than 10 grams of marijuana, instead they will face civil fines as follows:


Posted on Wed, 2013-09-25 19:17 by Kara Fischer in Civil Rights, Constitutional Law, Criminal Defense

 


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Maryland Recognizes Constitutional Right to Counsel at Initial Appearance Hearings


Anyone who has ever watched an episode of “Law & Order” can tell you that as a criminal defendant, you have the right to an attorney, and if you cannot afford an attorney, one will be provided for you by the state.