Joseph Greenwald & Laake, PA Blog - Family Law

Posted on Mon, 2019-08-12 09:20 by Jeffrey N. Greenblatt in Family Law

1.                   What made you become a lawyer?


I was a speech and drama major at Syracuse University.  I wanted to be a sports announcer.  When I graduated, I couldn’t even get someone to return my calls let alone a job offer.  I decided I’d go to law school and become a sports attorney if I couldn’t announce.  Well, that didn’t work out either. I couldn’t find a job in the area. I would have had to move to California and I was not up for it at the time.


2.            What will be the biggest challenge for the generation behind you? 

Posted on Mon, 2019-08-05 09:19 by Lindsay Parvis in Family Law, Divorce, Five Questions

1.       What made you become a lawyer?


My desire to help clients in crisis, and to navigate their way to a better situation while protecting their rights.


2.       What is it like being a woman in a male dominated field?

Posted on Wed, 2019-07-31 10:32 by Rama Taib-Lopez in

1. What made you become a lawyer?


I wanted to blend my economics background with international law by building a career in the field of international development and maybe get involved with an agency like USAID.  While I sure am far from that path, I still find my work rewarding and I enjoy applying the qualitative thinking to issues like alimony, child support, taxes, and business valuations. 


2. What is it like being a woman in a male dominated field?

Posted on Tue, 2019-07-16 14:23 by David Bulitt in Family Law

1.       What made you become a lawyer?    


I had watched the TV Show, 'Owen Marshall, Councelor at Law' and had really loved it. Also, both my father and grandfather pushed me to be a professional of some kind. The medical profession was out as I don't even like to give blood (even today!). That left me with two options: accounting and the law. Although I am decent with the numbers, I coulnd't see myself running them all day. Hence, the law. 


2.       What will be the biggest challenge for the generation behind you?

Posted on Mon, 2019-07-15 13:03 by Patrick Dragga in

1.       What made you become a lawyer? 


It was a natural path for me, as I am a son of a lawyer. Also, I have always enjoyed solving puzzles and helping others when possible, both of which are useful in my profession.  


2.       What will be the biggest challenge for the next generation?


Work-Life balance. They might be better at it than we were.


3.       What is the most interesting case you’ve ever had?

Posted on Fri, 2019-05-31 14:31 by Allison McFadden in

My previous blogpost talked about an opportunity to get an extra $250-$500 in your child’s 529 courtesy of the State of Maryland.  The deadline for applying to that program, “Save4College State Contribution Program.”, was May 31, 2019.  If you missed the opportunity to participate this year, set a reminder for next year! 

Posted on Tue, 2019-05-28 13:29 by Darin L. Rumer in

First, it’s not like an episode of Law & Order Special Victims Unit, but it can be!


Over the course of my legal career I’ve had hundreds of clients call me before, during, and after meeting with Child Protective Services (“CPS”) investigators.  Without a doubt, a client that called me before speaking with CPS, came out much, much better for it … regardless of whether they had done anything at all based on a malicious report from a bitter spouse, something was misinterpreted, or they really had done something inappropriate and truly needed legal representation.

Posted on Fri, 2019-05-17 09:39 by Allison McFadden in

Tax Day 2019 has passed and most people don’t even want to think about tax returns for another nine months.  If you’re going through, or recently went through, a divorce, filing taxes is one of the many simple things in your life that has changed.  You no longer get the tax benefits of filing as a married couple.  You are now filing single, with fewer or no dependents, might no longer have a mortgage interest deduction, etc.  This year we saw great change as the taxability of alimony completely changed, eliminating the one tax advantage (commonly known as the “divorce subsidy”) that the gov

Posted on Mon, 2019-04-29 11:36 by Rama Taib-Lopez in

The breakdown of a marriage can, in and of itself, be one of the most stressful times in one’s life.  And if your immigration status is based on your marriage to a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, a separation or divorce may introduce additional challenges and heighten your anxiety.  Sadly, it is not uncommon for a U.S. citizen or permanent resident spouse to even use their spouse’s immigration status as leverage in divorce, custody and child support matters. 

Posted on Tue, 2018-09-18 14:21 by JGL Associate Attorney in Family Law

Understandably, negotiating child custody can be one of the most difficult parts of a couple’s divorce or separation, as in most cases, both parents would like to remain an important part of the lives of their children. Oftentimes, parents going through a divorce or separation will use a mediation process to assist them with arising issues, including child custody. It is important that parents prepare for child custody mediation in order to negotiate the best possible outcome for themselves, and most importantly, for their children.

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