Joseph Greenwald & Laake, PA Blog - Family Law

Posted on Thu, 2018-02-22 13:53 by David Bulitt in

While divorce can be a painful process for all children, those who experience Attention Deficit Disorder (“ADD”) or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (“ADHD”) may have an even more complicated and difficult time adapting to the inevitable change that comes with his or her parents divorcing. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, the disorders are marked by patterns of inattention and impulsivity that can interfere with functioning and/or development.

Posted on Mon, 2018-02-12 15:54 by Jeffrey N. Greenblatt in

There has been a significant increase in the amount of gray divorces, or the divorce of couples after the age of 50, and a new tax law signed at the end of 2017 has the potential to affect them. 

Posted on Fri, 2018-01-05 14:26 by David Bulitt in Divorce

I have been a divorce lawyer for more than 30 years. Over that period, I have represented many parents with special needs children.  Maryland judges have also appointed me, on well over a hundred occasions, to represent children as a Best Interests Attorney. Many of those children have also had special needs.  These cases can be extremely difficult matters to litigate, particularly when the children experience mental health issues, learning disabilities or behavioral difficulties. The symptomology of these often cannot easily be seen, explained or understood.

Posted on Fri, 2017-12-08 11:55 by Reza Golesorkhi in

This may seem like a fairly obscure legal question, but questions along these lines have become fairly common. As divorces between working couples become more prevalent, so do the concerns of not just dividing marital assets, but also funds for retirement and what qualifies as income.

As a general rule, you can contribute to a regular IRA or a Roth IRA, if you have qualifying income.  So what counts as qualifying income?

There are three categories of qualifying income:

Posted on Thu, 2017-11-02 13:04 by David Bulitt in

As both a family law practitioner and a parent who has a child with an opioid addiction, I have, for many years now, had a front row seat to the damage that drugs can do to a family. Some years ago, we would encounter opioid addiction in a divorce case only occasionally. However, as the scope of this epidemic has grown in Maryland, so has its prevalence in child custody, divorce and in other family law matters.

Posted on Mon, 2017-09-18 15:42 by David Bulitt in

On August 7, 2017, the Maryland Court of Appeals, the state’s highest court, handed down a decision that will open a new avenue of defense to battered spouses in the state – in the extreme case where the spouse hires a hit man to kill the abuser.

Posted on Thu, 2017-03-16 15:41 by Jeffrey N. Greenblatt in Divorce

Suggestion:  How to Break the News of Your Divorce to Your Kids: Before, During and After the Discussion

When parents decide to end their marriage, one of their biggest concerns is how their children will cope with the news. Although children may struggle with this new transition, there are several things that parents can do to make it easier to break the news and to help their children get through the divorce process.

Posted on Mon, 2017-03-06 15:28 by Eleanor A. Hunt in Divorce

Facebook and Divorce

Facebook® has been hailed by many as the best online social networking service, enabling its users to connect with each other, and instantly exchange messages, post photos and receive and post status updates, with relative ease. However, in the past few years, numerous studies have been conducted showing a correlation between social media and divorce. Presuming that these studies are accurate, your Facebook page—along with Tumblr®, Twitter®, Instagram®, and countless other social media sites— could be one of the most powerful forms of evidence to be used against you during your divorce case. Indeed, the evidentiary effects of social media have been discussed on the JGL Blog. But note, as your Facebook account can be discovery in litigation, do not delete your Facebook or other social media pages prior to consulting with an attorney! Doing so could result in sanctions for destroying evidence.

Posted on Sun, 2017-02-26 12:01 by Reza Golesorkhi in

You are going to get married (or re-married). You have minor children (or no children).  You own a business.  You own a house.  You have substantial net worth.   Since you already own your own house and business before the marriage, as you understand it, in the off-chance it does not work out you will be okay financially.  Not exactly?