Joseph Greenwald & Laake, PA Blog - Family Law

Posted on Tue, 2020-03-31 09:29 by Allison McFadden in Family Law, Child Custody

As Governor Hogan’s most recent amended Executive Order went into place at 8:00 p.m. on March 30, 2020, the question of where their child would be staying for the imminent future was certainly running through the minds of many separated parents in Maryland. 

Posted on Wed, 2020-03-11 08:56 by Darin L. Rumer in Family Law, Custody

In Maryland, there is no legal statute stating that a parent’s gender should be taken into consideration when awarding child custody. Still, many men believe that the court will side with women in divorce proceedings mainly because historically, this was the case, at least when it came to child custody matters.[1]


These men do not believe that they have the same rights as the mothers of their children, legally speaking.

Posted on Mon, 2020-02-10 10:57 by Rama Taib-Lopez in

Current estimates show that about 70,000 Muslims now live in the state of Maryland.  When it comes to divorce, many Muslims are accustomed to using a technique known as “triple talaq,” in which a husband can divorce his wife by simply repeating the word “talaq” (the Arabic word for divorce) three times to the wife. Although triple talaq is not even not mentioned in the Quran, the practice has existed for decades and it is not the only means of divorce possible under Islamic law.

Posted on Mon, 2020-02-03 09:39 by Allison McFadden, David Bulitt in Family Law

Recently, the Government of Canada announced the first major overhaul to its family law system in over 20 years. Bill C-78 passed both houses of Parliament and received formal approval from Canada's Governor General on June 21, 2019. Unlike the United States, where issues like divorce and child custody are generally handled on a state-by-state basis, Canada has a single federal Divorce Act that governs these issues.


Why Did Canada Need to Change Its System?

Posted on Mon, 2020-02-03 09:39 by Allison McFadden, David Bulitt in Family Law

Recently, the Government of Canada announced the first major overhaul to its family law system in over 20 years. Bill C-78 passed both houses of Parliament and received formal approval from Canada's Governor General on June 21, 2019. Unlike the United States, where issues like divorce and child custody are generally handled on a state-by-state basis, Canada has a single federal Divorce Act that governs these issues.


Why Did Canada Need to Change Its System?

Posted on Mon, 2019-10-28 10:07 by Reza Golesorkhi in Five Questions, Family Law

1.       What made you become a lawyer?


My college professor was a personal injury lawyer and taught a course called Legal Aspects of Medicine.  He soon became a mentor.  I then was applying to Medical School but my wife got pregnant which changed my career path as Medicine would take 12 + years and Law took only 3 years. Hence, I chose law. 


2.       What will be the biggest challenge for the generation behind you?

Posted on Tue, 2019-10-22 23:00 by Lindsay Parvis in Family Law, Divorce, Maryland

This blog, the second in a three-part series, (click here for Part 1) looks at other states’ grounds for divorce and how they compare to Maryland, when considering the broader question (discussed in Part 3) about whether it’s time to overhaul Maryland’s grounds for divorce.  Part

Posted on Tue, 2019-10-15 14:11 by Allison McFadden in Divorce, Family Law, Custody, Social Media

Sharing our thoughts, photos and personal details on social media is so ingrained in many peoples’ lives that we do not think twice about the wealth of information left behind for anyone and everyone to discover.  But it should be a thought and consideration if you find in yourself heading towards a divorce or custody litigation.  As part of the discovery process you will likely have to produce complete copies of the history of your social media accounts.  It does not matter if your accounts are set to private - there is still a duty to provide the relevant discovery.

Posted on Mon, 2019-10-14 11:46 by Darin L. Rumer in Five Questions, Family Law

 1.       What made you become a lawyer?


In college (in the South), I studied psychology and sociology.  I wanted to become a family counselor.  I took a job on weekends and in the summer working at a group home for underprivileged children.  After witnessing a friend and colleague being racially discriminated against, firsthand, it motivated me to use my influence in law for social good.  The next semester I started to study for the LSAT and to look at law schools.  I’ve been practicing law for almost 20 years and I still look to protect the disenfranchised.

Posted on Mon, 2019-09-09 13:01 by Allison McFadden in Family Law, Five Questions

1.       What made you become a lawyer?


I started out in college as an education major, thinking that I wanted to teach and eventually become a professor.  I did not enjoy my education classes at all, and by chance I took a legal writing class as an elective.  It focused on persuasive writing, and I found that I really enjoyed it.  That planted a seed, and got me to start looking into law school.  I ended up working for a year after college before going to law school, and that solidified the decision for me.


2.       What is it like being a woman in a male dominated field?

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