Joseph Greenwald & Laake, PA Blog - Labor & Employment

Posted on Tue, 2022-05-24 06:27 by in Labor & Employement

Work is a significant part of people’s lives, and it’s important to feel respected and valued by employers. Employment discrimination occurs when an employer treats an employee or applicant less favorably, based on their race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, or status as a protected veteran. We all deserve to be treated equally, and job discrimination is never acceptable.

Posted on Fri, 2022-03-18 12:22 by in Labor & Employment

Family businesses can become a bit complicated when looking into how labor laws apply to them. It can be tempting to take a more relaxed approach when employing family members, but skirting the line of legality can blur the boundaries for your non-familial employees as well. To avoid becoming entangled in any legal trouble, you are better off following the rules to the letter.

Posted on Tue, 2022-02-22 08:59 by Erika Jacobsen White in #MeToo

Under current law, with few exceptions, employers may force employees to give up their right to a jury trial as a condition of employment - even in the cases of civil rights violations, including sexual harassment and sexual assault.  Under such “forced arbitration” provisions, employees often face employer-friendly “judges” who are paid by the employer themselves, and who may be repeat players.  Force arbitration provisions also impose limitations on the right to appeal, and frequently limit discovery, making it difficult for employees to prosecute their cases.  Employers may also legally

Posted on Wed, 2021-12-29 05:51 by in

Yes and no. The Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) was created to protect employees while on leave due to medical reasons. However, under certain circumstances, an employee can be fired.  Let’s look at what the FMLA is and when you can and cannot be fired while on or returning from medical leave.


What is the FMLA?

The FMLA is a federal, nationwide law that provides employees with twelve weeks of unpaid leave per year. Employers cannot discipline an employee for applying or taking medical leave covered by the FMLA.

Posted on Tue, 2021-04-06 13:18 by Erika Jacobsen White, Lindsay Parvis in Family Law, Labor & Employment

Intimate partner violence and abuse is on the rise during the pandemic.  The statistics are staggering – 1 in 4 women and 1 in 10 men experience intimate partner violence in some form.[1]  Intimate partner violence can take many forms including emotional, physical, sexual or financial – it impacts women and men of every race, gender, orientation, and class.

Posted on Tue, 2021-04-06 13:18 by Erika Jacobsen White, Lindsay Parvis in Family Law, Labor & Employment

Intimate partner violence and abuse is on the rise during the pandemic.  The statistics are staggering – 1 in 4 women and 1 in 10 men experience intimate partner violence in some form.[1]  Intimate partner violence can take many forms including emotional, physical, sexual or financial – it impacts women and men of every race, gender, orientation, and class.

Posted on Sat, 2020-06-13 12:51 by Veronica Nannis in Covid19, Labor & Employement

AS MANY AMERICANS HEAD BACK TO THE WORKPLACE, EEOC UPDATES ITS PANDEMIC EEO GUIDANCE:


WHAT CAN EMPLOYERS DO & WHAT CAN EMPLOYEES DEMAND?

Posted on Wed, 2020-03-25 10:13 by Jerry D Miller in Business Law

Effective April 2, 2020 businesses with up to 500 employees will be subject to expanded paid sick and family leave obligations.      


Sick Leave - Under the new law, all employees are eligible for 80 hours of paid sick leave under the following COVID-19 related circumstances:


1. If the employee is subject to a federal, state or local quarantine or isolation;  


2. If the employees advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine; 


3. If the employee is symptoms and seeking medical diagnosis; 

Posted on Sun, 2020-03-22 11:10 by Erika Jacobsen White in Labor & Employement, Civil Rights

En Espanol


The federal government is now in a state of National Emergency, and shelter-in-place orders are starting to be issued to protect people from COVID-19 (the novel coronavirus). States and local governments are shuttering the doors of schools, courts, and other places of mass gatherings. 

Posted on Mon, 2019-10-07 09:23 by Brian J. Markovitz in Overtime, Labor and Employment

Overtime pay for workweeks involving more than 40 hours of work is just one of the protections the law provides to prevent the exploitation of working people.  The Department of Labor revises its policies periodically to reflect the changes in the economy, and the overtime pay regulations are no exception to this principle.  On September 24, 2019, the U.S.

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