Joseph Greenwald & Laake, PA Blog - Labor & Employment

Posted on Mon, 2018-08-13 15:34 by Brian J. Markovitz in

While it may at first glance seem that a non-profit organization’s philanthropic nature would set it apart from profit-driven business models, the legal reality of running a non-profit is actually often similar to that of a for-profit business. This is especially true regarding employer-employee relations, and the employer’s obligations to the employee under federal, state, and local employment laws and ordinances.  It is very rare indeed that employment-related, legal requirements are different for non-profit employers than that of companies. 

Posted on Thu, 2018-05-31 14:53 by Veronica Nannis in

 


With the recent cancellation of ABC’s sitcom Roseanne, many are talking about the First Amendment and its reach within the workplace. Did Roseanne have the right to speak her opinion? Does ABC have the right to fire her? JGL Principal Veronica Nannis explores this current situation from all sides in her most recent blog.    

Posted on Tue, 2017-10-17 14:04 by Jay P. Holland in Labor Employment

We may not all know the term emoji, but we have all seen them or used them. Emojis are small digital images or icons used to express an idea or emotion onine. The term is only a couple of decades old and derives from the Japanese words e, a picture, and moji, a letter or character.

Posted on Thu, 2017-05-25 12:20 by Brian J. Markovitz in Labor Law

More and more frequently, employers are evading the legal requirement to pay overtime to their employees by choosing to pay them on a salaried basis instead of an hourly wage, and then telling the employees that they’re not entitled to overtime because they have an “exempt” job title. But often this practice amounts to nothing more than illegal wage theft from workers who should be classified as hourly and are being denied overtime pay that they deserve.

Posted on Thu, 2016-03-17 07:03 by Jay P. Holland in

Can Employers Conduct Mental Health Screenings


On February 26, 2016, a coworker shot seventeen employees at a Kansas factory, three of whom were killed. While this was a high profile active shooting, unfortunately, it is not the only such workplace shooting.  As investigators piece together the motives for the murders, there is no question that there has been an alarming uptick of active shooting incidents in the U.S. over the past few years.


Posted on Thu, 2016-01-07 13:33 by Joseph M. Creed in


This week, a judge in Los Angeles, California vacated a $7.1 million verdict in favor of former Los Angeles Times sports columnist T.J. Simers, who claimed that the paper discriminated against him because of his age and disability. Simers alleged that the discrimination began after he suffered a stroke and other health problems in 2013, when he was 62 years old. Among other things, the newspaper cut his column from three times a week to two, and suspended him for alleged ethics violations. The newspaper ultimately took his column away altogether and reassigned him to sports reporting, which Simers considered a demotion. After the demotion, Simers resigned.


Posted on Tue, 2015-10-13 06:57 by Levi S. Zaslow in


This blog is a summary of recent significant appellate decisions by the Court of Special of Appeals of Maryland in the areas of Workers’ Compensation, Insurance, Landlord-Tenant, Guardianship, Lead Paint, Corporations and Associations, Foreclosure, and Family Law. 


Workers’ Compensation


Long v. Injured Workers’ Insurance Fund, No. 2615, Sept. Term, 2013 (Md. Ct. Spec. App. Sept. 30, 2015).

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