Joseph Greenwald & Laake, PA Blog - Labor & Employment

Posted on Mon, 2017-11-20 15:05 by Jason M. Sarfati in Labor Employment

A friend of mine recently called me in a panic.  After returning from a weeklong vacation out of the country, his manager asked to meet in an empty conference room.  Apparently during his absence, the members of my friend’s team had missed an important deadline.  Although he was not personally responsible for the deadline itself, a critical component necessary to meet it was hidden away in a file that only he had access to.  Unable to locate the file, and unable to reach my friend either by phone or email, the team missed the deadline and his company was forced to pass on a major opportunit

Posted on Wed, 2017-10-18 14:14 by Jason M. Sarfati in

     In recent days, an online campaign designed to highlight the prevalence of sexual assault and harassment has spread across social media.  Frustrated by the number of women stepping forward with allegations of sexual misconduct by Hollywood tycoon Harvey Weinstein, Actress Alyssa Milano, the star of ABC’s Who’s The Boss? and The WB’s Charmed, posted to Twitter with one simple message: 

“‘Me too.’  If all the women who have been sexually harassed or assaulted wrote ‘Me too’ as a status, we might give people a sense of the magnitude of the problem.”

Posted on Tue, 2017-10-17 14:04 by Jay P. Holland in Labor Employment

We may not all know the term emoji, but we have all seen them or used them. Emojis are small digital images or icons used to express an idea or emotion onine. The term is only a couple of decades old and derives from the Japanese words e, a picture, and moji, a letter or character.

Posted on Thu, 2017-05-25 12:20 by Brian J. Markovitz in Labor Law

More and more frequently, employers are evading the legal requirement to pay overtime to their employees by choosing to pay them on a salaried basis instead of an hourly wage, and then telling the employees that they’re not entitled to overtime because they have an “exempt” job title. But often this practice amounts to nothing more than illegal wage theft from workers who should be classified as hourly and are being denied overtime pay that they deserve.

Posted on Thu, 2016-03-17 07:03 by Jay P. Holland in

Can Employers Conduct Mental Health Screenings

On February 26, 2016, a coworker shot seventeen employees at a Kansas factory, three of whom were killed. While this was a high profile active shooting, unfortunately, it is not the only such workplace shooting.  As investigators piece together the motives for the murders, there is no question that there has been an alarming uptick of active shooting incidents in the U.S. over the past few years.

Posted on Thu, 2016-01-07 13:33 by Joseph M. Creed in

This week, a judge in Los Angeles, California vacated a $7.1 million verdict in favor of former Los Angeles Times sports columnist T.J. Simers, who claimed that the paper discriminated against him because of his age and disability. Simers alleged that the discrimination began after he suffered a stroke and other health problems in 2013, when he was 62 years old. Among other things, the newspaper cut his column from three times a week to two, and suspended him for alleged ethics violations. The newspaper ultimately took his column away altogether and reassigned him to sports reporting, which Simers considered a demotion. After the demotion, Simers resigned.

Posted on Tue, 2015-10-13 06:57 by Levi S. Zaslow in

This blog is a summary of recent significant appellate decisions by the Court of Special of Appeals of Maryland in the areas of Workers’ Compensation, Insurance, Landlord-Tenant, Guardianship, Lead Paint, Corporations and Associations, Foreclosure, and Family Law. 

Workers’ Compensation

Long v. Injured Workers’ Insurance Fund, No. 2615, Sept. Term, 2013 (Md. Ct. Spec. App. Sept. 30, 2015).

Posted on Wed, 2015-07-22 12:18 by Debora Fajer-Smith in

Uber Factor - Independent Contractor vs Employee

We all realize the internet has caused paradigm shifts in the market place – possibly in ways never imagined.

Posted on Thu, 2015-04-30 13:57 by Matthew E. Kreiser in

As a labor and employment attorney, I am often asked by potential clients if they have a viable claim against their employer for being subjected to a “hostile working environment.” And why would they not? Many people feel they are subjected to difficult working conditions, and the word “hostile” is a loaded term, perceived to be attention grabbing and capable of capturing interest. Although it sounds like an all-encompassing claim, the law has very particular requirements to satisfactorily allege that one was, indeed, subjected to an unlawful, hostile working environment.