Civil Litigation

Posted on Thu, 2016-11-10 10:45 by JGL Associate Attorney in appellate, Civil Litigation


On September 22, 2016, the D.C. Court of Appeals issued a decision in favor of our clients in their battle over membership and control of Jericho Baptist Church Ministries, Inc., a large, nationally-known church located in Landover, Maryland. The court affirmed a lower court decision that a purported board of trustees that seized control of Jericho in 2010 and terminated our clients’ membership rights was not the valid board of Jericho. The effect of the court’s decision affirmed the return of control over Jericho to the original Board of Trustees, which includes Rev. Joel Peebles, the senior pastor whose parents founded the church more than 50 years ago. This decision marks a key victory for Rev. Peebles and is also a significant ruling in First Amendment law concerning the establishment of religion.


Posted on Fri, 2014-11-14 11:22 by Matthew M. Bryant in Civil Litigation



Have you received a subpoena from an administrative agency that is seeking documents or an interview with you? What next?


Posted on Fri, 2014-10-17 14:04 by Tamara A. O'Connell in Civil Litigation


We’ve all seen the shock-value headlines: “Oh My God, Naked Photos of Kate Upton!”[i] “Jennifer Lawrence Speaks For the First Time About Her Stolen Nude Photos”[ii] There is a movie called “Sex Tape,” in which a couple “discover that their most private video is no longer private.”[iii] On a smaller scale, a scorned lover, spouse, girlfriend, or boyfriend may get revenge by sharing intimate images with others by populating them to social media or uploading them to websites where people share such private images. When two people take consensual, intimate photographs, the subject does not expect that the photos will be posted on the Internet for all to see. However, if the relationship sours, the privacy of an unsuspecting victim may be compromised as the photos are posted on Twitter, Facebook, and websites like myex.com, in an attempt to get revenge.   


Posted on Thu, 2014-09-18 13:54 by Levi S. Zaslow in Sports, Labor Law, Civil Litigation, Labor Employment


(Photo Credit: UPI/ AP; New York Post)


One of the most explosive issues in sports right now is the NFL’s discipline of its players.  Discipline has been inconsistent, the NFL is accused of seriously mishandling cases, and there is public outcry about some players’ conduct.  The two-game suspension, and subsequent indefinite suspension, of former Ravens’ running back Ray Rice is reflective of many of the broken parts of this process. 


Posted on Fri, 2014-08-15 00:00 by in Civil Litigation, Sports

 images


(Pro Football, Inc. d/b/a/ The Washington Redskins)


DC’s professional football team, the Washington Redskins, has been in the news quite a bit as of late – and most of it has not been good. Earlier this summer, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued a 2-1 ruling in Blackhorse v. Pro-Football, Inc. cancelling the team’s trademarks.


washington-redskins-logo


 (One of the trademarks registered to Pro Football, Inc. d/b/a/ The Washington Redskins)


On Wednesday, the United States Patent And Trademark Office (Trademark Trial and Appeal Board or “TTAB”) canceled the Washington Redskins’ trademark registrations in the start of what is likely to be a lengthy legal battle.


Posted on Fri, 2014-06-06 17:55 by Jarrod S. Sharp in Civil Litigation

  terps2 This past  January, I wrote about the University of Maryland v.

 


images


Can an employer be liable for racist and sexist comments by a client or business partner—someone who does not even work for the employer—toward one of its employees?


Under a recent decision by the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, the answer is “yes.” In Freeman v. Dal-Tile Corp., a decision issued on April 29, 2014, the Fourth Circuit recognized that an employer can be liable for harassment perpetrated by a third-party against one of its employees.


Posted on Mon, 2014-05-05 13:41 by Levi S. Zaslow in Civil Litigation, Maryland Law, Personal Injury


In a unanimous decision, the Court of Appeals of Maryland recently held in Blackburn Ltd. Partnership v. Paul,[1] that all Maryland public pools have a duty to comply with Maryland’s swimming pool barrier safety regulations.[2] The Court recognized that the pool barrier safety regulations were designed for the protection of young children from accidental drowning and near-drowning by limiting or delaying their access to swimming pools, spas and hot tubs.


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